And the Internets go on and on and on and on

The more I think about it, the more I realize there is nothing more artistic than to love others.
Vincent Van Gogh

“At the time, my friend Brian argued that if it came down to it, he wanted to be able to defend himself. That if he didn’t have a gun, he was really just prepping for his someone else, who could just come and take all his carefully curated supplies.”
The Case For Not Panic Buying A Gun, by Jacob Margolis, LAist, 18 March 2020

Gah.
Continue reading And the Internets go on and on and on and on

Oh Internet Oh Internet

“A woman is like a tea bag – you can’t tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water.”
Eleanor Roosevelt

“In the year 1930, John Maynard Keynes predicted that, by century’s end, technology would have advanced sufficiently that countries like Great Britain or the United States would have achieved a 15-hour work week. There’s every reason to believe he was right. In technological terms, we are quite capable of this. And yet it didn’t happen. Instead, technology has been marshaled, if anything, to figure out ways to make us all work more. In order to achieve this, jobs have had to be created that are, effectively, pointless. Huge swathes of people, in Europe and North America in particular, spend their entire working lives performing tasks they secretly believe do not really need to be performed. The moral and spiritual damage that comes from this situation is profound. It is a scar across our collective soul. Yet virtually no one talks about it.”
On the Phenomenon of Bullshit Jobs: A Work Rant, by David Graeber, The Strike, Issue 3 The Summer Of… August 2013

The post that got a book deal for a great book.
Continue reading Oh Internet Oh Internet

Oh Internets!

“As a longtime health care reporter, I see the unfolding coronavirus pandemic as representing everything I’ve read about — from the early days of epidemiology to the staggering toll of the 1918 Spanish Flu pandemic — but had not covered in my lifetime.

“And still, I have been caught off guard by the pushback from top elected officials and even some friends and acquaintances who keep comparing it to the flu.”
This Coronavirus Is Unlike Anything in Our Lifetime. The Facts You Need To Know, by Charles Ornstein, ProPublica, 15 March 2020

“‘We buy valuable handwritings of Brigitte Bardot, Grace Kelly, Charles Lindbergh, Napoleon Bonaparte and other well-known personalities at worldwide auctions,’ says the company on Instagram. ‘And all this just to irretrievably destroy these precious artifacts [sic] for our new SEKRÈ luxury handbags. 📜✂️Insane? Maybe a bit, but we do it intentionally.'”

“The practice has been condemned by antiquarian booksellers. ‘Once a manuscript has been taken apart in this way it is lost forever. They are part of our shared history,’ said Sally Burdon, president of the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers. ‘It is difficult to understand any motivating factor behind the making the Sekrè handbags beyond the single obvious one of seeking a point of difference to make more sales … Is this destruction really worth it? Letters and manuscripts give us an insight into the character of the author of the letter and a feel for the time when they were written. This can be said for both an important letter and even something as apparently insignificant as a shopping list or a thank you letter.'”
Bag firm adds ‘unique’ appeal by stitching in historical figures’ letters, by Alison Flood, The Guardian, 14 March 2020

What the f…? Huh.
Continue reading Oh Internets!

Sure and begorrah the internets

“My Poet loves words in a way that I feel is quite unhealthy and unnatural. She owns a dictionary decades old and so large she uses a small buffet cart to wheel it around our apartment like some invalid relative. For true fiction writers, words are just a kind of filling for the plot. A novel is like one of those mock apple pies made with Ritz crackers and cinnamon—and anyone who claims he can tell the difference is a damn liar!”
My Poet, by Naeem Murr, Poetry, July/August 2007

“L.A.’s hottest neighborhood is where the city’s existential crises have come home to roost.”
Gentrifying Highland Park’s War on the Middle Class, by Andrew Gumbel, Los Angeleno, 30 Jan 2020

“The decision by employees at crowdfunding company Kickstarter to unionize is a historic first in the tech industry, highlighting the growing trend of worker activism in Silicon Valley.”
Kickstarter union seen as breakthrough for tech activism by Chris Mills Rodrigo, The Hill, 20 Feb 2020

“Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) said Monday he wants to give monthly checks to low-income and middle-class Americans so they can afford necessities during the coronavirus outbreak.

“‘Let’s cut out employers as the middle men and get relief to people not in weeks but in days,’ Cotton wrote in a Medium post outlining his proposals for a Senate bill. ‘We should send relief directly to American families most likely to be in need — those in the bottom and middle tax brackets — to pay for rent, groceries, childcare, and other necessary expenses, as well as to spend at local businesses that are hurting during this crisis.’

“Cotton, who knocked the House-passed coronavirus response bill as too complicated, suggested the money could come from tax rebates or through unemployment agencies.”
GOP Sen. Cotton calls for monthly cash payments to Americans during coronavirus pandemic, by Brooke Seipel, The Hill, 16 March 2020

If this isn’t some kind of trap… this is my kind of Republican!
Continue reading Sure and begorrah the internets

Internetia

Ginger Mayerson Collage show at KAFN cafe in Glendale, now until I’m not sure. Only 14 collages and great coffee; totally worth the trip, in my opinion.
The owner and I pronounce it “Kaf-en” but they tell me people under 15 pronounce it “caffeine”. KAVN will happily serve you no matter how you pronounce it.
Strange, I retire from collage and keep getting shows. This one I’d almost given up on. Oh well.
KAFN, 1019 E Palmer Ave, Glendale, CA 91205, (818) 696-2555 Hours: 7am-6pm 7 days a week

“This is probably the most un-Victorian manner possible to articulate this information, but the Anna Cora Mowatt poems I recorded for Librivox earlier this month are now available – along with several other lovely selections by various other poets from other talented volunteers — for your listening pleasure.”
My Librivox “Album” has Dropped!, by Kelly S. Taylor, The Lady Actress, 3 February 2020

“Mowatt wrote The Fortune Hunter to be submitted to a contest held by the New World newspaper. (The novel won the $100 prize.) Contest rules dictated that the title of the work, that the setting had to be New York, and that the text had to be completed within six months. So, recycling a few characters from short stories written under the pen name “Helen Berkeley,” Mowatt quickly created a tale that started with two fashionable fellows in search of wealthy wives — Brainard and Ellery. They, in turn, are pursued by the inexorable debt collector, Mr. Badger. Then the reader is introduced to the objects of the bachelors’ chase, the Clinton sisters. The elder sister, Rachel, has become so disgusted with this cynical game of fortune hunting that she has decided to renounce her claim to her portion of her father’s fortune to escape the mendacity of suitors like Brainard and Ellery. Ester, the melodramatic, Byron-quoting, younger sister (who is now trying to go by the name Estelle) is perfectly happy to play the game, as long as it is by the rules she sets. Love is no game to Miss Arria Walton, the penniless orphan ward of the Clinton’s father and best friend of the sisters, who is desperately in love with young Dr. Edgar Chadwick. Rapid twists and turns of fate and sudden reversals of fortune characterize the plot of this comic melodrama that is part Jane Austen, part Charles Dickens, but establishes a delightful Victorian Americana flavoring all of its own.
The Fortune Hunter: A Novel of New York Society, as read by Kelly S. Taylor, Librivox, 10 March 2020

“You need to treat job candidates with respect. Their time is just as valuable as yours–and in many cases more valuable. You’re receiving a paycheck for all the time you spend recruiting. Candidates receive no paycheck and may be using up their precious vacation time to do so. Candidates may pay for babysitters, transportation, and even new clothes for interviews. Please respect that time.

“I don’t condone ghosting–from candidates or companies. I do, however, support the right of any candidate to walk out of a job interview when it’s clear that the company doesn’t respect them or their time.

“If your company treats job candidates poorly, candidates will take that as a sign that they will treat employees even worse. Make sure you respect your candidates, or they may walk out the door.”
This Job Candidate Walked Out Before His Interview Started. The Reason Is Instructive for Any Employer by Suzanne Lucas, circa 9 March 2020 (because I can’t find a date on the post, which annoys me)

“175 years ago (1845) The Park Theatre in New York City witnesses the debut of Fashion by Anna Cora Mowatt, considered the first U.S.-born woman to have her plays professionally produced. None other than Edgar Allen Poe reviews the piece, twice, unfavorably: ‘Estimated by the natural principles of dramatic art,’ he writes, ‘it is altogether unworthy of notice.’ Still, the play will be known as the first American comedy of manners.”
This Month in Theatre History, by The Oscar G. Brockett Center for Theatre History and Criticism, American Theater, 5 March 2020

Untrue! EA Poe saw it, like, 40 times and fell in love with it. The truth is here!

“The Tlacolulokos exhibition “For the Pride of Your Hometown, the Way of the Elders, and in Memory of the Forgotten” opened on March 1st. It will be on display until December at The Museum of Latin American Art (MOLAA) in Long Beach.”

“This home for their art seems lightyears away from 2018, when the mural-based art collective famously had their visas revoked and confiscated by customs agents at San Francisco International Airport on Jan. 8, 2018. While the artists are still denied to the U.S., their art stands tall and strong in Long Beach.”
After being Deported, these Oaxacan Muralists are back and now have a ‘Permanent’ Show at MOLAA
LA Taco, Areli Morales, 5 March 2020

The only way to discover the limits of the possible is to go beyond them into the impossible.
Arthur C. Clarke
Continue reading Internetia